Thursday, February 6, 2020

How the Declaration of Independence was accepted in America and Europe Essay

How the Declaration of Independence was accepted in America and Europe - Essay Example American Revolutionary War was the last part of the political American Revolution, so it was expected that the Great Britain would offer its colonies their rights; unfortunately, the colonists had refuted the civil liberties of the Parliament of Great Britain in ruling them with no representation. In the mid 1770s, revolutionaries were in charge of all of the thirteen colonial governments. They established the Second Continental Congress, while at the same time forming a Continental Army. Formal requests to the King to intervene on behalf of the colonial governments were ignored; rather, the outcome was the Congress declaring the colonial governments as traitors, which led to rebellion by the state in the following year. This led to Americans taking action and proclaiming themselves a new independent nation. They asserted jurisdiction and declined any obligation with the British rule. Later on in 1770, the Continentals incarcerated a British army, which resulted in France joining the war and supporting the Americans. Early the following year, the military had empowered with Britain, which resulted in Spain and Dutch Republic joining forces with Britain as French allies. During the course of the war, the British had utilized their naval power in taking over, as well as inhabiting the coastal cities. They had also gained control over the countryside where most of the occupants were avoiding them due to their comparatively small land army. The involvement of France was significant, since in early 1980s, there was a victory in Chesapeake which led to the surrendering of the second British army in Yorktown. Later on there was the signing of the Treaty of Paris that acknowledged the supremacy of the United States over a number of territories (Vigil 23). Effects of the Declaration of Independence on Revolutionary War Declaration of Independence had a number of effects on the Revolutionary War, some of which were negative, as well as positive. All the stakeholders invo lved in both the signing of this treaty and the revolutionary war either suffered or gained as a result. These impacts were tremendous, since the expectations of the Great Britain were completely diminished, while at the same time their colonies gained independence. By giving out the Declaration of Independence, which was accepted by the Continental Congress, the thirteen American colonies totally damaged their political connections with the Great Britain, since the Declaration highlighted the colonists’ tenacity in achieving their independence. By asserting themselves as an independent nation, the American colonists were capable of finalizing a legitimate coalition with the French government. Therefore, they achieve their cooperation in the war against the Great Britain. The British Imperial policies had for a long time oppressed the North American colonists, especially when it came to issues relating to taxation and frontier policy. Despite protests on these British policie s, Great Britain did nothing to change the situation; instead, this resulted in the closure of the port of Boston, along with the declaration of martial law in Massachusetts. Apart from that, the colonial government propelled representatives to a Continental Congress so as to synchronize a colonial ban on British goods. As a result of this, when war began between the British forces and American colonists in Massachusetts, the Continental C

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Steps in Medical Billing Process Essay Example for Free

Steps in Medical Billing Process Essay There are several steps to the medical billing process step one to ten are as follows: Preregister patients, Establish financial responsibility for visits, Check in the patients, Check out the patients, Review coding compliance, Check billing compliance, Prepare and transmit claims, Monitor payer adjudication, Generate patient statements and finally Follow up patients payments and handle collections. Preregister patients is when you schedule and update appointments and collect insurance information for the patients. When you are scheduling appointments for new patient you need to get basic information and insurance information and reason for appointment. Establishing Financial Responsibility is an important step where you must determine what services are covered under the patients insurance and what service they are responsible for this also help if a preauthorization is need and ensures that are information is done and billed correctly. Check in Patients This is when you collect all necessary information from the patient such as copies for insurance cards. This is also, where you can collect copays and make sure the patient’s information is correct and updated if need be. Check out Patients This is where you record the proper medical codes for the visit. This is also where you provide information if the patient has made a payment or how much they owe and to make sure it is coded properly so the patient will be charged correctly. If payment or copays have been made then a receipt is given. Review Coding Compliance This is where guidelines must be follow when coding the visit. This must be checked for errors and the visit and the code should be connected so the payer understands the charges. Check Billing Compliance Each charge, or fee, for a visit is related to a specific procedure code. The provider’s fees for services are listed on the medical practice’s fee schedule. Most medical practices have standard fee schedules listing their usual fees. Even through there is separate codes for each fee not all are necessarily billable Prepare and Transmit Claims This is where the claims are prepared and submit in a timely manner listing the diagnosis, procedures, and charges for the payer. Most are sent electronically and each practice, as a policy as to when claims are filed be it daily, every other day etc. Monitor Payer Adjudication is where the where the health plans decide rather to pay the whole bill, part of the bill or deny the bill altogether. It is important for them to get their money as soon as possible, this is also where any discrepancies are address, and an appeal is then file if there are any discrepancies found. Generate Patients Statements This is where payments are listed from the payer, and what is still owed and what the patient is being billed it is them mailed to the patient. The date of service and any balances , and services provided are all listed on the statement. Follow up patients payments and collections this is where patients payments are monitored and checked and if they are behind they are sent a notice and if still no response collection procedures maybe started.

Monday, January 20, 2020

Essay --

The Great Depression was an economic problem in North America, Europe, and other industrialized countries around the world that began in 1929 and lasted until 1939. It was the longest and most stressing depression ever. The U.S. economy had gone into a depression six months earlier, but the Great Depression had begun with a breakdown of stock-market prices on the New York Stock Exchange in October 1929. The next three years stock prices in the United States had continued to drop, until 1932 it had dropped to about 20% of its value. Other than messing up thousands of individual investors, the decline in the value of good banks and other financial facilities went bad. Many banks were constantly forced to hide their debts, and that’s why by 1933, 11,000 of the United States 25,000 banks had failed. The failure of so many banks was because of the lack of confidence the economy had, which had led to too much reduced of spending and demanding money. This was constantly dropping, and unemployment began rising. By 1932, U.S. manufacturing had dropped to 54% of its money, and unemployment had gone up to between 12 and 15 million workers. The Great Depression began in the United States, but then had turned into a worldwide economic problem. The United States was trying to come out from the depression as the main one in the depression. National economies had been weakened by the depression itself, but by war debts in Germany and other defeated nations to. So once the American economy had dropped and the money of American investments to Europe was gone, the depression had become worst than nations that were mostly in debt to the United States, Germany and Great Britain. In Germany, unemployment began to raise high in 1929, and by 1932. It ... ...ing completely out of reserves making it harder to purchase stocks and bonds to improve their businesses. The Great Depression ended as nations went up on their production of war materials at the beginning of World War II. This had made production better, made more jobs, and put a bunch of money back into business so that the economy would be better again. What I have learned through this research paper is that the economy will never be perfect. It does not matter how many polices the government makes, people will be people and continue to spend money in ways that could affect the economy. Majority of people require loans today since we have wants and needs in order to live. I do not believe the US economy would ever go back to the times of the Depression since more people have jobs today, there is not one central bank anymore and having a better economic system. Essay -- The Great Depression was an economic problem in North America, Europe, and other industrialized countries around the world that began in 1929 and lasted until 1939. It was the longest and most stressing depression ever. The U.S. economy had gone into a depression six months earlier, but the Great Depression had begun with a breakdown of stock-market prices on the New York Stock Exchange in October 1929. The next three years stock prices in the United States had continued to drop, until 1932 it had dropped to about 20% of its value. Other than messing up thousands of individual investors, the decline in the value of good banks and other financial facilities went bad. Many banks were constantly forced to hide their debts, and that’s why by 1933, 11,000 of the United States 25,000 banks had failed. The failure of so many banks was because of the lack of confidence the economy had, which had led to too much reduced of spending and demanding money. This was constantly dropping, and unemployment began rising. By 1932, U.S. manufacturing had dropped to 54% of its money, and unemployment had gone up to between 12 and 15 million workers. The Great Depression began in the United States, but then had turned into a worldwide economic problem. The United States was trying to come out from the depression as the main one in the depression. National economies had been weakened by the depression itself, but by war debts in Germany and other defeated nations to. So once the American economy had dropped and the money of American investments to Europe was gone, the depression had become worst than nations that were mostly in debt to the United States, Germany and Great Britain. In Germany, unemployment began to raise high in 1929, and by 1932. It ... ...ing completely out of reserves making it harder to purchase stocks and bonds to improve their businesses. The Great Depression ended as nations went up on their production of war materials at the beginning of World War II. This had made production better, made more jobs, and put a bunch of money back into business so that the economy would be better again. What I have learned through this research paper is that the economy will never be perfect. It does not matter how many polices the government makes, people will be people and continue to spend money in ways that could affect the economy. Majority of people require loans today since we have wants and needs in order to live. I do not believe the US economy would ever go back to the times of the Depression since more people have jobs today, there is not one central bank anymore and having a better economic system.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

Back to School Essay

They say that education is the most important thing for society. That education is the way out of trouble, poverty, unemployment and many other things. But all of this is hard to understand for children, and that is a problem, for it is them who are in the education system. So how do you get kids and youngsters to understand the importance of education and hard work? That is what Barrack Obama – the president of the United States of America – has tried to do. He gave the speech â€Å"Back to School† to students of all ages in the school system trying to evoke in them a feeling of responsibility when it comes to school and education. This paper analyzes and comments on that speech, and it partly focuses on how he addresses his audience, and what feelings he evokes in them. When you talk about rhetoric there is a classic way of building it up: The opening comes first. Here Obama says hello and talks about the first day in a semester day, such as that exact day. Then the narrative which is some background information. Here he talks about his own experience as a schoolboy. After that comes the argumentation. In this part all the main weight of the speech is. He talks about responsibility, opportunities and so on. Then normally comes the refutation, but that part it not present in this speech, so at no point does he come with any arguments against his proposition, but on the other hand that would also be stupid in this case. In the end is of cause the ending. Here he concludes what he expects from all the students. This makes it all very easy understandable and easy to follow, which is important when he is addressing kids and youngsters. The main point he is making is that all the students should work hard in school so they can get a good education. As a ground for this main statement he says that a good education is needed if one wants to become something in life, and that jobs and money does not come from nothing. He uses different kinds of rhetorical techniques when he argues his points. He starts off by addressing the audience personally in the very first line, â€Å"Hello everyone – how’s everybody doing today? † (l. 1). This makes the audience pay much more attention than if he had just said something such as ‘welcome’ for instance. Throughout the speech he often repeats a word or the beginning of a sentence such as it is seen in lines 164-165. Here he repeats the phrase â€Å"I expect †¦Ã¢â‚¬ . This gives his words more substance. When you read or hear it you really focus on the things that are repeated. So when it is used here you really understand exactly what it is he wants the students to do. Another thing that he does to really capture his audience is to give them examples that they can relate to or compare themselves to. This is done in line 92 to 107. This is also good, because it is a quite young audience he is addressing in this speech and it makes the whole thing easier accessible for them. He also tells his own story, and thereby makes himself more relatable. That is important, because when kids see Obama they see a famous person but none the less a stranger, and therefore an adult whom they do not know how to relate to. All these things make him more unrelatable for the young people. So when he reveals details about his own childhood he creates a trust bond between himself and his audience, and in that way makes the kids want to listen and more likely agree with him. In America national sentiment is very common, and responsibility towards the country is often used as a means to encourage and motivate people. This feeling is something that Obama also takes advantage of, â€Å"If you don’t do that – if you quit on school – you’re not just quitting on yourself, you’re quitting on your country† (ll. 63-64). The country and the responsibility to it are mentioned several times. The feeling that the students have to do well in school not just for themselves, but for their country, is then built up through the speech to a degree where it almost causes bad continence for those who does not take their school seriously. Obama addresses his audience with a great deal of empathy, â€Å"Now I know it’s not always easy to do well in school. I know a lot of you have challenges in your lives right now that can make it hard to focus on your schoolwork. [Here is a line break in the text] I get it. I know what that’s like. † (ll. 65-67). This is another thing that minimizes the distance between Obama and his audience. This empathy causes people to respect him more because they feel they are somewhat on the same page. It makes the audience want to listen because they now can see that he is not unaware or indifferent of the obstacles in their lives. Throughout the speech Obama uses pathos as the main way of persuasion. â€Å"And even when you’re struggling, even when you’re discouraged, and you feel like other people have given up on you – don’t ever give up on yourself. Because when you give up on yourself, you give up on your country. † (ll. 147-149), here it is the feelings and emotions he appeals to. This is a very strong way of appealing to appealing to people, because it makes people more likely to agree, because they are emotional. In lines 158 to 160 he gives a line of questions. Those questions are meant so the audience will be encouraged to do something with their lives and therefore focus on their education. It is not questions about whether or not they will achieve something in life, it is questions about what that will achieve in life. That way he tricks the audience into feeling that they have to achieve something, something for their country. Through the use of different rhetorical techniques, such as repetition, appeal to emotions, a line of questions and leveling himself with his audience, he achieves a convincing argumentation. He addresses his young audience with empathy, and reveals his own story to them which makes the distance between him and his audience smaller. So maybe Barrack Obama has found the right way to address a young audience, and convince them to work harder in the schools.

Saturday, January 4, 2020

The Waste Land By Eliot - 1870 Words

‘It is obvious that we hear many voices in The Waste Land, less clear that what we hear is the voice of someone.’ Discuss. In this essay, I am going to argue that in T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land, we do hear many voices, but they are not the voice of an identifiable person, and that is entirely clear. Furthermore, it is not problematic that the reader is unable to identify a single speaker, as the distance that is created between the poem and the reader is a stylistic choice made by the poet. One of the sole functions of The Waste Land is to problematise the status quo. In being unable to identify a single, all-encompassing and consistent authorial voice or poetic persona, as is possible in most poetry pre-dating The Waste Land, Eliot actively makes reading the poem an uncomfortable experience, as â€Å"we are plunged into the middle of the modern urban world with its multitudes of faceless individuals.† It is this defamiliarisation which contributes to The Waste Land being viewed as the epitome of modernist writing – even being given the label of â€Å"high modernism.† Most of Eliot’s poems are transitional works, formed as a product of tumultuous events occurring in his life. It is widely noted that Gerontion coincides with what many agree was the â€Å"worst year of his [Eliot’s] life.† As is inherent in transitional work due to the resulting personal development which accompanies such periods of change in one’s life, there are several voices present. At times, these voices areShow MoreRelatedThe Waste Land By. Eliot1134 Words   |  5 PagesThe Waste Land, by T.S. Eliot, is a journey through the arid, unproductive modern world. This poem was written post World War I when the world was still recovering. Evidence of the war could still be seen. The ground was still battle worn, and man still broken of spiritual guidance. This current state of being is what fueled Eliot’s writing. Through the poem, he connects the conditions of modern society to an infertile world void of water and spirituality. Despite the dese rt-like setting, there areRead MoreTs Eliot the Waste Land3186 Words   |  13 PagesJessica Joy T.S. Eliot’s â€Å"The Waste Land† Final Paper Eliot imparts to us the Grail quest’s influence on â€Å"The Waste Land† in the notes: â€Å"Not only the title, but the plan and a good deal of the incidental symbolism of the poem were suggested by Miss Jessie L. Weston’s book on the Grail legend: From Ritual to Romance (Macmillan). Indeed, so deeply am I indebted, Miss Weston’s book will elucidate the difficulties of the poem much better than my notes can do; and I recommend it (apartRead MoreEliot s The Waste Land998 Words   |  4 PagesIn T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land, the use of multiple speakers and both obvious and obscure references are techniques utilized to condemn the culture around him at the time in which he was living. His pretentious criticism of this disconnected, immoral, and uneducated society allows us to see that Eliot values unity, morality, and a quality education in a way that the people around him do not. Eliot uses a substantial amount of fragmentation in The Waste Land to symbolize the brokenness of the societyRead MoreEliot s The Waste Land1798 Words   |  8 PagesEliot’s â€Å"The Waste Land† was written to seek order in a disturbed world. Eliot’s publication caused a significant impact on modern society and the literary world. Initially, the poem seems to be incoherent and fragmented; after readers have observed his poem, they are able to recognize Eliot’s brilliantly unique and nontraditional use of techniques. His unconventional style, graphic imagery, and sheer inconsistency of the poem has greatly mystified and fascinated readers. While Eliot was writing â€Å"TheRead MoreThe Waste Land by T. S. Eliot2649 Words   |  11 Pages A wasteland [weyst-land] is defined as: land that is uncultivated or barren; an area that is devastated as by flood, storm, or war; something as a period of history, phase of existence, or locality that is spiritually, o r intellectually barren; one of the most important poems of the twentieth century (Dictionary.com). The Waste Land, by T.S. Eliot, has puzzled its audience and been tossed aside by the general population since 1922, when the poem was published. To a reader not committed to delvingRead MoreThe Waste Land by T.S. Eliot Essay1522 Words   |  7 PagesThe Waste Land, a 434-line modernist poem by T.S. Eliot revolves around a world of what seems to be chaotic and dead, and led by a single protagonist. Throughout The Waste Land, there are many uses of symbolism with tarot cards, astrology, and especially the game of chess: The game of chess is such a meaningful symbol throughout the story, that metaphors are used to describe the situation and emotions of the characters throughout the poem by describing them as chess pieces and in check-mate situationsRead MoreAllusion In The Waste Land By T. S. Eliot921 Words   |  4 Pages These lines are from the poem The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot. Tho ugh Eliot is purposefully obscure and vague in the poem, this stanza is pretty clear when analyzed. In this stanza, it represents the literal translation about the aftermath of World War 1 and the feelings that are reverberated by it. In the lines, â€Å"After the agony in stony places / The shouting and the crying† (388). The stony places are to represent the destruction of Europe. This is accompanied by the great sadness and pain thatRead MoreAnalysis Of Eliot s Poem The Waste Land 1401 Words   |  6 PagesThomas Stearns Eliot, an American scholar, sophisticated, diverse, and also poetic genius claimed by both the United States and England, is the twentieth century s touchstone author. Thomas had a problem with religion, as noted by his poem â€Å"Journey of the Magi,† and eventually converted from Anglicanism (â€Å"T. S. Eliot: His Religion, His Poetry, His Roles†). First published in 1922, T.S. Eliot s poem The Waste Land is a major work of modern lite rature. His poem is written in the aftermath of theRead MoreT. S. Eliot The Waste Land Essay1551 Words   |  7 Pages17 Oct 2017 Progressivism as a Project of Humanity: Roosevelt, Wilson, the Great War These fragments I have shored against my ruins Why then Ile fit you. Hireronymo’s mad againe. Datta. Dayadhvam. Damyata. Shantih shantih shantih --T.s. Eliot, The Waste Land (1922)[1] I. THE AFTERMATH of the Industrial Revolution revealed new realities born of the marriage between technology and capitalism. Central to the Progressive motivation was the human relationship with Capital, an invisible entity whoseRead MoreAnalysis of The Waste Land by T. S. Eliot1571 Words   |  7 Pages(post)modern counterpart. The message this phrase bears, resonates throughout the entire poem: from its title, â€Å"The Waste Land†, to its final mantra â€Å"Shantih shantih shantih†. All words, phrases and sentences (or just simply images) which make up this poem seem to, in Levi-Strauss’ words, â€Å"be a valeur symbolique zero [and the signifier] can take on any value required †, meaning that the images Eliot uses do not have one fixed signification and consequently conjure up thought-provoking ideas that need to

Friday, December 27, 2019

The Effects Of Cell Phones On Public And Private Space

Research Paper Sanjay Singh California State University, Fresno IT 102-Industrial Computer Concepts and Applications James Thornburgh, Ed.D. April 2015 The Effect Cell Phones and the Internet Has on the Public and Private Space With cell phone use increasing around the world, it would be ignorant to claim that the way people communicate has remained the same as it was twenty years ago. Today, cell phones have not only shown themselves as a convenient replacement to the traditional wired telephone, but can also, rather effectively, replace a home computer for most of everything the average computer is used for. They can connect to the internet, take and share pictures, make posts on social networks, and much more. For†¦show more content†¦This makes cell phones seem like a necessity to the majority of people, even if they led a perfectly successful life before having one (Rosen 457-61). Some would say that the expanding number of cell phone users, being connected to each other at all times, increases communication is not necessarily a good thing. With cell phones becoming able to do more than just make calls, there are more excuses to pull out a phone and use it. Many people, the younger ones especially show signs of obsession with and addiction to their cell phones when they part with it in some way (Leung). When a person uses their phone around other people, they are still physically there, but mentally they are with whomever they are communicating with. In effect, they blend the two circles together. People who talk on their cell phones around other people not only intrude upon whatever was going on around them, but also force what they are doing on everyone by sharing their conversation. Some people have a, â€Å"because I can, I should† mentality when it comes to cell phones, using them wherever and whenever they want, regardless of whom is around. People on the streets may be loudly explaining the particulars of a private subject in the middle of a crowd of people. Surveys show, that the general consensus is that speaking on a cell phone next to someone is rude and annoying, and yet it still happens. With more and

Thursday, December 19, 2019

Protagonist And Antagonist In Antigone By Sophocles

Protagonist and Antagonist Antigone is a Greek tragedy by Sophocles. ONE OF THE three surviving tragedians of classical Athens, along with Aeschylus and Euripides, and one of the great dramatists of world literature, Sophocles spanned in his long life (497-406 B.C.) the cultural flowering of Athens in the fifth century(Segal 1). Antigone is named after the daughter of King Oedipus of Thebes, a young woman who stood against the king’s decision and believed in the gods’ law. There are many arguments regarding who is the real protagonist and antagonist in this play. The protagonist is generally regarded as the good guy and antagonist is the bad guy. Antigone is a protagonist as she is the title character in the†¦show more content†¦She insists that for her, there is nothing as great as death with glory. This refusal to follow the law of the land is what brings about her death. It is to this passage (Lns 450-460) that those critics especially poin t who see in Antigone the self-appointed upholder of divine as against human law. Antigone plays her part as peitho, yet remains true to her basic characterization (Adam 8). In this way Antigone is the classic tragic hero as seen in literature, a clear main character. Creon is an antagonist of the play because he refuses to allow Antigone to bury her brother Polyneices, . The antagonist often shares some of the most notable traits as the protagonist, although for different reasons. Creon doesn’t listen to anyone. He is stubborn and his pride is so great, he can’t bring himself to acknowledge that he could ever be wrong. Creon knows that the only reasonable way to promote peace in Thebes is to be strict in his punishment of those who attacked Thebes. This includes Polyneices, since he was the one who led the attack against Thebes. The range of motives he can understand is limited, including â€Å"lust for power and greed for money†(Winnington 4). He believes he is on the only possible path and his goal is noble. He is the hero of his own story and wants something that he has thought about, considered and has decided to go after. Creon rejects the rules laid downShow MoreRelated Sophocles Antigone - Antigone and Creon, the Powerful Protagonists1244 Words   |  5 PagesThe Two Protagonists of Antigone In the classic model of dramatic structure, two characters move the action of the play from introduction to climax to resolution with their conflict. One of these characters is the protagonist; the other is the antagonist. The protagonist is generally regarded as the good guy, and the antagonist is the bad guy. In Sophocles play Antigone, the lines between protagonist and antagonist are blurred. In the Greek tradition, the title character is the protagonistRead MoreKreon, Tragic Hero in Antigone Essay546 Words   |  3 PagesIn the play, Antigone, by Sophocles, there is a character, King Kreon, who is portrayed as the tragic hero, or protagonist. A tragic hero is the main character with tragic flaw, or a defect that leads to their downfall and the character is usually of high status. King Kreon would be considered the protagonist because he is opposed by an antagonist and is the main character in the play, he has the tragic flaws of stubbornness and too much self-pride, and these f laws are struck with bad luck. KingRead More The Tragic Hero: Creon or Antigone? Essay1293 Words   |  6 Pages In the Greek tragedy Antigone, the characters Antigone and Creon can both be thought of as the tragic hero of the play. Though Antigone does show some of these characteristics of a tragic hero, Creon demonstrates the attributes more clearly and concisely. Creon is the King of Thebes, as well as the uncle of Antigone. Creon took the throne after a tragic quarrel between his two nephews, Eteocles and Polyneices. Despite his harsh governing and his crude ideals, he is not good or bad. Creon is theRead MoreAntigone by Sophocles1059 Words   |  5 Pages In the book Antigone, Creon and Antigone can be considered as the tragic heroes of the play. Antigone is considered the tragic hero because of the characteristics she shows such as her ambition to defeat Creon, Creon shows more of the characteristics clearly. Creon is the king of Thebes. He is also Antigones uncle. Creon became king after a fight between Eteocles and Polyneices. One may see Creon as a harsh and controlling ruler, but he is not good nor bad because he shows signs of both like whenRead MoreWho Is More Tragic, Creon or Antigone?863 Words   |  4 Pagesof the character. In Antigone, both Creon and Antigone share some tragic elements: tragic hero, hamartia, hubris, and nemesis. However, Creon is a more tragic hero than Antigone because his character has tragic elements that are absent from the character of Antigone: anagnorisis, peripeteia, and catharsis. There are many tragic elements that both Creon and Antigone share. According to Aristotle, the hero must be a character of high birth or national prominence. Since Antigone is royalty and CreonRead MoreCharacterization of Antigone in Sophocles Antigone2448 Words   |  10 Pages     Ã‚  Ã‚   Sophocles’ tragic drama, Antigone, presents to the reader a full range of characters: static and dynamic, flat and round; they are portrayed mostly through the showing technique. In â€Å"Sophocles’ Praise of Man and the Conflicts of the Antigone,† Charles Paul Segal takes the stand that there are two protagonists in the drama (which conflicts with this reader’s interpretation): This is not to say that there are not conceptual issues involved in the characters of Creon and Antigone. But theRead MoreMajor Works Data Sheet : Fiction2158 Words   |  9 Pagesinformation about the author: Sophocles was born around 496 B.C. In Athens, Greece. Due to the fact that his father was a wealthy merchant, Sophocles had an excellent education. He was elected twice to become a high ranking military officer. He then died around 406 B.C. Sophocles is considered one of the greatest Greek play writers. He was the fist to add a third main character and the first to get rid of trilogic form. As a result, Sophocles had to shorten all of the â€Å"actionRead MoreThe Sophocles Play Antigone:1581 Words   |  7 PagesThe Sophocles Play Antigone: All the way through this play Antigone is solely being devoted to her family. Antigone is eager to go above and beyond her limits for her family. Antigone is a vital character in this play. Antigone is a very brave, passionate, and willing character that is not enthusiastic about her brother being defiled even if it means her own life. Creon is a character that he knows all commandments and is influenced that he must abide it. Creon then has compassion for AntigoneRead MoreContrast of Beliefs in Sophocles ´ Antigone762 Words   |  3 PagesBeing able to be a brave and narrow-minded is not an easy or usual characteristic. But, author Sophocles seems to portray this characteristic flawlessly in the play Antigone. In Antigone, King Creon decides Eteocles should have a proper burial while Polyneices should just be left to rot after these two brothers have a brutal fight and anyone who buries Polyneices should be punished. But, their sister Antigone opposes this and decides to go aga inst Creon’s word and buries Polyneices. When Creon findsRead MoreAntigone2454 Words   |  10 PagesAntigone– The Characterization Sophocles’ tragic drama, Antigone, presents to the reader a full range of characters: static and dynamic, flat and round; they are portrayed mostly through the showing technique. In â€Å"Sophocles’ Praise of Man and the Conflicts of the Antigone,† Charles Paul Segal takes the stand that there are two protagonists in the drama (which conflicts with this reader’s interpretation): This is not to say that there are not conceptual issues